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Margeaux Gray
Assistant Research Professor of Biobehavioral Health
Summary Statement

Margeaux Gray's translational sleep research is focused on nonpharmacologic interventions to improve sleep quality and continuity, with topics of emphasis including the interaction among sleep, pain, and attention, and sleep fragmentation's impact on daytime function.

Department
  • Biobehavioral Health - BBH
  • Sleep, Health, and Society
  • Center for Health Aging
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Phone
Office Address
259 Health and Human Development
The Pennsylvania State University
University Park, PA 16802
Interests

Dr. (Schade) Gray's translational sleep research is focused on nonpharmacologic interventions to improve sleep quality and continuity; the interaction among sleep, pain, and attention; different characterizations of sleep fragmentation and the breadth of their impact on daytime neurobehavioral and neurocognitive processes; and how sleep facilitates, or how its features reflect, progress toward developmental milestones. She is currently a member of the Sleep, Health, and Society Collaboratory of Dr. Orfeu Buxton and Dr. Anne-Marie Chang. Margeaux has an active interest in sleep industry collaboration. In previous training at the West Virginia University, Margeaux worked on pediatric and postpartum sleep topics.

Margeaux double-majored in neuroscience and psychology at Dickinson College in Carlisle, PA, where she earned her B.S. She was employed as a Registered Polysomnographic Technologist and instructor before earning her Ph.D. in Behavioral Neuroscience at West Virginia University (Morgantown, WV), in their Psychology Department. There, she worked primarily in the Sleep and Sleep Disorders laboratory of Hawley E. Montgomery-Downs, Ph.D. while supported in part by a NIGMS T32 fellowship, and also pursued translational experience in the Hearing Perception and Cognition lab of James W. Lewis, Ph.D. (WVU Neuroscience Dept.) and in the Anxiety, Psychophysiology, and Pain research lab of Daniel W. McNeil, Ph.D. (Psychology Dept.).

Research Interests
  • Different characterizations of sleep fragmentation and the breadth of their impact on daytime neurobehavioral and neurocognitive processes.
  • The interactions of sleep, pain, and attention.
  • Nonpharmacologic interventions to improve sleep quality and/or continuity.
  • How sleep facilitates, or how its features reflect, progress toward developmental milestones.
Publications